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Tree Collard cuttings VCO-3250

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Perennial Greens on a tall stalk sweeter and more tender than regular collards.

This delicious perennial vegetable (in zones 7-10) is an important permaculture crop.

If it says "out of stock" go ahead and order. We are getting fresh cuttings every week. We mail them out at the start of each week so they don't spend the weekend in the post office.  We cannot ship these out of the continental US.
Tree collard greens are tender and delicious in cool weather, so they are a good choice for a low-maintenance winter vegetable in mild climates. High-yielding year-round. This plant make a thick stalk that will branch and crawl around, or can be trimmed to a single "trunk" and staked.We've grown these wonderful plants in our research gardens for decades.
They are always perennial in zones 8-10. In zone 7, they are normally perennial except in very prolonged cold spells, or if freeze/thaw conditions prevent drainage around the roots.
In colder zones, if you have established plants, you could try taking cuttings as winter begins and rooting them indoors for planting out the following spring.  They would need a greenhouse, very sunny window, or other well-lighted place.
Their history and biological identity seem to be shrouded in mystery, but they are reputed to have come from Africa as essential food, and have been preserved and passed on within African-American communities in this country.

They do not normally flower or make seed, and when they do, the seed does not breed true. Instead propagation is by cuttings, which are passed along from gardener to gardener.

We offer these in sets of three cuttings with instructions for rooting them.

Each cutting has several nodes from which leaves or roots will sprout. Cuttings should be put in pots in good potting soil (with half of the nodes below the soil and half above) and kept moist and in the shade to develop roots for a couple of months before planting out in the garden. Leaves may begin to grow at first but then will stop until good roots are formed. We cannot guarantee that all three cuttings will survive; conditions en route or in your own area may keep them from being successful. SORRY, WE CANNOT SHIP TREE COLLARD CUTTINGS TO FOREIGN ADDRESSES OR OUTSIDE OF THE CONTINENTAL US. They are too unlikely to survive the journey.
They'll be sent via Priority US Mail and should be placed in soil as soon as they arrive if possible.
If you do not have the pots ready right away, they can be put in a vase with water for a day or two. If you order other items, these may come separately. Additional Information: Perennial A favorite veggie meal in our house is fried potatoes and onions, with a heap of collard greens steaming on top, and melting sharp cheddar over everything in the end. Walnuts at any point are a wonderful addition. It takes a while to steam the collard leaves into succulence, so I put them on top of the fry right away and cover it all with a lid. The onions and potatoes of course must be turned several times in the frying, and to do this I simply pluck most of the cooking greens and drop them temporarily into a container, returning them to the top of the fry when I am done with turning things over. "What's a tree collard? It's a perennial "tree" that produces amazingly huge collard-like leaves… which taste like an intriguing cross between collards and kale with just a hint of purple cabbage. They're great in stir fries, "beanie greenies," soups and even in scrambled eggs… I love them as wrappers for Whole Foods' "Guac-Kale-Mole" and salsa, but they also sauté nicely as strips with a bit of garlic and lemon juice. I've added them as the green in "Beanie Greenies," too. David and I particularly like Beanie Greenies with a splash of wheat free tamari, chipotle pepper, and a hint of miso and blackstrap molasses. Yum! In the past, I've had terrible luck growing collards, so I am thrilled with these tree collards. - Laura Bruno's blog - laurabruno.files.wordpress.com


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Customer Reviews

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Second try
on 07/29/16 by GOLDEN TRADEWELL in Louisiana

This is my second order. The first 3 plants did not work. I had ordered them in the Fall thinking that they would do well. The second time I ordered was in early spring. One plant has survived....even in this brutal heat that we have in SWLA. I do have it in shade and will probably place it in a permanent place in the Fall.

Treecollards
Rooted in 1 week :)
on 07/21/16 by Roger Forbes in Dania Beach, FL

Instructions that came with the tree collard cuttings said I'd have roots in 2 months. I did it a different way and had leaves and roots in 1 week. Made cuts below the lowest node, dipped in clonex rooting hormone gel, planted them in clear plastic cups (so I could see the roots) with my favorite organic potting mix, placed them in a propagation tray with a dome and a heat mat set to 77 degrees, and 24 hour fluorescent grow bulbs. Watered with rain water from my rain harvesting system. I live in zone 10 so excited to grow these all year.

Tree Collard
on 07/14/16 by Shel in Hawaii

I ordered Tree Collard back in 2013 and all my cuttings grew. I have continued propagating from my original order. Thank you, Bountiful Gardens!

Better Luck Next Time
on 07/09/16 by Brandon

I tried to start these indoors under very good grow lights. Followed all instructions. All three died. I am trying again and hope to have success this time. I understand that rooting cuttings comes with its ups and downs and sometimes the cuttings just don't take. I find tree collards to be especially difficult compared to other things I have rooted.

All 3 Died
on 04/20/16 by Andy Renner in Georgia

I put them in a mixture of Vermiculite, Coco Coir, light Organic fertilizer mix, Worm Castings, and humus. Let's just say I spent some money on this soil and watered regularly to keep the coco damp, but never overly wet. Kept under indoor lights with a lot of other successfully growing plants, so the environment was ideal at the right temps, humidity and light cycle. I even pumped in CO2 and dipped into a rooting hormone prior to planting, plus added mycorrhiza to the root zone. What went wrong? All 3 died and I am very bummed.

One of my favorite greens!
on 03/06/16 by Madeline in CA

I've had mine for a few years now. Originally, two out of the three cuttings survived. Which is fine, since the remaining two plants are giant! I staked them originally. Now they have a big wooden frame I built around them. I blend 3 or 4 leaves with fruit for a green smoothie. I use baby leaves in salads. Keep saying I'll try cooking them, but they've been delicious raw. I love that they're perennial (and that you offer them for sale).

Very Happy
on 02/24/16 by Raymond Smith in Gold Beach OR

I got my three cuttings on 2-10-2016 and I planed each in very different ways. Fist one outside in a half whisky barrel filled with 1/2 hoers manure and 1/2 compost. I was not planing on plating anything here at this time, it was still to hot. But this cutting was much larger than i had planed for. It Stormed the fist week it was out, cool and heavy hail. I thought I may as well haved throw it in the compost pit but it's doing great. It has very dark purple leafs. 2nd cutting I paced in a small pot with a potting mix in a west facing widow. This one had leafs the next day and now has many light green leafs. 3rd cutting I placed in a small pot with potting mix in a north facing bay widow. This cutting "as the others" is doing very well and has many dark green leafs. I plan on trans planting 2nd & 3rd cutting in to my spaces at the community garden. The first cutting will stay in the half whisky barrel but will be sharing its home with a fig tree soon.

Very Impressed
on 10/18/15 by George Ortego in TX

I ordered two sets of cuttings, they arrived midweek but I was unable to work with them until the weekend. I left them in the original packing for a few days. Saturday morning, I unwrapped the cuttings and set them in a cup of water to re-hydrate for a few hours, while I got some good potting soil. That evening when the heat of the sun was fading, I filled up six one gallon pots with the potting soil. As I would insert half the length of the cutting in a pot I would trim of a small piece exposing fresh cutting and dip it in some rooting compound. I am not sure this last step was necessary, but this is what I did. I kept the plants and soil moist, then, after a few days, leaves started sprouting out of the nodes on the cuttings Not only did the cuttings survived shipment, but they are thriving. Once they are stronger I will move them to a permanent home. I was very impressed.

Not That easy
on 08/15/15 by Johnny

I ordered these last spring. In the beginning they did fine but then slowly went south and eventually died. I babied these cuttings to no avail. I had 3 so was hoping to get at least 1 to take. They were planted in good soil, compost, worm castings, rock dust, mixed with peat moss. I would love to try again, but for the price, Im not sure if I will.

They are beautiful!
on 06/04/15 by William in CA

I cut the bottom steam about 1/2 - 1 inch then I scraped off some skin in the range from 1inch to 2inches from the fresh bottom steam and dipped them into a gel rooting hormone. After that I stuck them in a pre-made hole which the soil was pre-moisten and left it there for a day. Then I watered the plants every other day. Boom!!! all three are growing! But beware, check the bottom leaves apparently mealybugs and aphids love them. Not a problem, use Neem Oil : Good Luck everyone, they are absolutely beautiful plants to have.

All three cuttings have rooted1
on 04/18/15 by Kay Doggestt in SC

I purchased three of these cuttings as soon as they were available. I live in SC very near to the GA line. I followed the directions and planted them in pots with Miracle Grow potting soil in 1 gal pots indoors. As soon as it got warm enough, I took them outside during the day to get some sun. One of them is really large- about a foot tall. The other two are smaller, but they all have leaves and appear to be healthy.

Top Quality Tree Collards
on 11/06/14 by Lisa

I received my tree collards in the mail today and I was ecstatic!! These little beauties arrived healthy looking, green and already sprouting leaves. I was very impressed with the quality of these plants and am looking forward to watching them grow grow grow!